Chelsea Green Publishing

Beyond You and Me

Pages:304 pages
Size: 7.5 x 9.75 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856230384
Pub. Date January 15, 2014

Beyond You and Me

Inspirations and Wisdom for Building Community

Edited by Kosha Anja Joubert and Robin Alfred

Availability: In Stock


Available Date:
January 15, 2014


Beyond You and Me is the first volume in the Four Keys to Sustainable Communities series and is a practical anthology for anyone seeking to rebuild existing fragmented villages and communities, establish new group enterprises and ecovillages, and heal the wounds of conflict and social division. It is for those seeking to live cooperatively and in peace with fellow human beings and the Earth.

Since the beginning of human history, we have lived in communities. That is, however, until the mid-twentieth century, when cheap fossil-fuel energy has enabled many of us in industrialized countries to live more socially dispersed and isolated lives. But now, escalating climate change, peak oil, and the need to radically reduce our carbon consumption dictate that this unsustainable way of life cannot continue. We must relearn the art of community building and conflict resolution.

Beyond You and Me offers skills in communication, conflict resolution, leadership, facilitation, and consensus decision making, and an inspiring perspective on solving global problems. Written by an international group of social and ecological pioneers, it includes the voices of Marshall B. Rosenberg, Wangaari Maathai, Starhawk, Azriel Cohen, Hildur Jackson, and Helena Norberg-Hodge.

The Four Keys represent the four dimensions of sustainable design—the Worldview, the Social, the Ecological, and the Economic. This series is endorsed by UNESCO and is an official contribution to the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. The other books of the series are Gaian Economics, Designing Ecological Habitats, and The Song of the Earth. The Four Keys to Sustainable Communities series was completed in 2012 and is now available in the U.S. for the first time.


Growing, Older

Growing, Older

By Joan Dye Gussow

Michael Pollan calls her one of his food heroes. Barbara Kingsolver credits her with shaping the history and politics of food in the United States. And countless others who have vied for a food revolution, pushed organics, and reawakened Americans to growing their own food and eating locally consider her both teacher and muse.Joan Gussow has influenced thousands through her books, This Organic Life and The Feeding Web, her lectures, and the simple fact that she lives what she preaches. Now in her eighties, she stops once more to pass along some wisdom-surprising, inspiring, and controversial-via the pen.

Gussow's memoir Growing, Older begins when she loses her husband of 40 years to cancer and, two weeks later, finds herself skipping down the street-much to her alarm. Why wasn't she grieving in all the normal ways? With humor and wit, she explains how she stopped worrying about why she was smiling and went on worrying, instead, and as she always has, about the possibility that the world around her was headed off a cliff. But hers is not a tale, or message, of gloom. Rather it is an affirmation of a life's work-and work in general.

Lacking a partner's assistance, Gussow continued the hard labor of growing her own year-round diet. She dealt single-handedly with a rising tidal river that regularly drowned her garden, with muskrat interlopers, broken appliances, bodily decay, and river trash-all the while bucking popular notions of how "an elderly widowed woman" ought to behave.

Scattered throughout are urgent suggestions about what growing older on a changing planet will call on all of us to do: learn self-reliance and self-restraint, yield graciously if not always happily to necessity, and-since there is no other choice-come to terms with the insistencies of the natural world. Gussow delivers another literary gem-one that women curious about aging, gardeners curious about contending with increasingly intense weather, or environmentalists curious about the future will embrace.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

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Growing, Older

Joan Dye Gussow

Paperback $17.95

Letting in the Wild Edges

Letting in the Wild Edges

By Glennie Kindred

In this beautifully illustrated book, Glennie Kindred inspires us to celebrate the bounties of our wild native plants and find a richer relationship with the natural world around us.

Season by season, we are shown how to grow and manage native edible and medicinal plants in our gardens or on the wild edges of the land. Included are foraging tips and many recipes for making kitchen medicines and delicious food from our finds.

By letting the wild native plants into our lives, Glennie helps us reconnect with our rich herbal heritage and enter into a new relationship with our local environment. She encourages us to forage, grow, and eat our edible natives, season by season, and also to strengthen our health with their healing properties.

She explores many different ways to mark and celebrate the seasons, especially outside on the land, which support our ability to adapt and grow for the benefit of the Earth and ourselves.

This is a practical, optimistic and inspirational treasure trove for a more creative, integrated, self-reliant future.

Available in: Paperback

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Letting in the Wild Edges

Glennie Kindred, Maddy Harland

Paperback $24.95

Living above the Store

Living above the Store

By Martin Melaver

The economic crash of late 2008 is just the latest evidence of the truth that many have known for so long: that too much of our modern economy is based on a house of cards. We need businesses that not only factor their impact on people and places into their equations for success but also strive to restore the communities and environments in which they operate. How can this be done?

In Living Above the Store, Martin Melaver provides a roadmap for creating such a business. It's not only a "how to" but a "why to" that challenges business as usual to change.

Living Above the Store brings us into the story of Melaver, Inc., a third-generation, 70-year-old family real estate business, as it evolves toward becoming a thought and product leader in sustainable business practices. It is part business management theory and part case study, where sustainable principles meet sustainable practices, always grounded in day-to-day practice.

Living Above the Store demonstrates how to:

  • Adopt a business model that provides for economic success while contributing to society and the environment
  • Shape a business culture that is restorative to a workforce by helping employees realize their highest potential
  • Leverage an ethos within a business that "ripples outward" to foster restoration of both land and community
  • Embrace a notion of limits to growth
  • Reframe ideas about competition, proprietary knowledge, and business success,

Living Above the Store is for readers who care about issues of community and sustainability as well as for those who want to learn more about how a socially responsible business can first redefine, and then find, success.

Available in: eBook

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Living above the Store

Martin Melaver, Ray Anderson

eBook $27.95

A Man Apart

A Man Apart

By Peter Forbes and Helen Whybrow

A story of friendship, encouragement, and the quest to design a better world

A Man Apart is the story—part family memoir and part biography—of Peter Forbes and Helen Whybrow’s longtime friendship with Bill Coperthwaite (A Handmade Life), whose unusual life and fierce ideals helped them examine and understand their own.

Coperthwaite inspired many by living close to nature and in opposition to contemporary society, and was often compared to Henry David Thoreau. Much like Helen and Scott Nearing, who were his friends and mentors, Coperthwaite led a 55-year-long “experiment in living” on a remote stretch of Maine coast. There he created a homestead of wooden, multistoried yurts, a form of architecture for which he was known around the world. Coperthwaite also embodied a philosophy that he called “democratic living,” which was about empowering all people to have agency over their lives in order to create a better community. The central question of Coperthwaite’s life was, “How can I live according to what I believe?”

In this intimate and honest account—framed by Coperthwaite’s sudden death and brought alive through the month-long adventure of building with him what would turn out to be his last yurt—Forbes and Whybrow explore the timeless lessons of Coperthwaite’s experiment in intentional living and self-reliance. They also reveal an important story about the power and complexities of mentorship: the opening of one’s life to someone else to learn together, and carrying on in that person’s physical absence.

While mourning Coperthwaite’s death and coming to understand the real meaning of his life and how it endures through their own, Forbes and Whybrow craft a story that reveals why it’s important to seek direct experience, to be drawn to beauty and simplicity, to create rather than critique, and to encourage others.

Available in: Hardcover, eBook

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A Man Apart

Helen Whybrow, Peter Forbes

Hardcover $35.00