Chelsea Green Publishing

Climate Change

Pages:96 pages
Book Art:Color photos
Size: 4.75 x 6.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603581066
Pub. Date April 21, 2009

Climate Change

Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
April 21, 2009

$7.95

You know that the ice caps are melting, the seasons are changing, sea levels are rising, storms are on the increase, but what can you do about it? Plenty!

This book puts the power back into your hands in the face of the doom and gloom of climate change. You don’t have to wait for someone else to sort it out; rather than worry and feel helpless, you can get up and do something.

Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference is packed with ideas for action, from simple everyday things that cost nothing to bigger projects that involve more time and money. For example:

Get on your bike • Buy local food • Turn off your TV • Insulate your attic • Recycle and compost • Take the train • Turn down the heat • Install solar panels

Do your part and protect the planet for today and tomorrow.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jon Clift

Jon Clift has a Masters degree in Sustainable Environmental Management and has been growing vegetables and fruit for many years in his gardens and allotments, and windowsills. Along with Amanda Cuthbert, he has authored six Green Books' titles on environmental issues.  He works as a freelance environmental consultant and lives in South Devon, England.

Amanda Cuthbert

Amanda Cuthbert has been growing vegetables and fruit for many years in her gardens, allotments, and windowsills. Along with Jon Clift, she is the author of six Green Books' titles on environmental issues. She lives in Devon, England where she works as a freelance writer and marketing consultant.

AUTHOR VIDEOS

Jonathan with a tip to save energy around the water cooler

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